Courses

DEEP Summer Academy offers a wide variety of courses to students. While we have broken down our course offerings into several streams related by areas of study and subject matter, students are not only welcome but encouraged to select from any of the various course offerings. 

*Course has reached maximum occupancy

Engineering a Healthier World

Emergency Room Plays (J-EHW-1A)

Instructor: Hiba Doudar
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
The emergency department has a critical role in the function of the health care system. Canadian emergency departments often experience long wait times and even longer referrals to specialized doctors. In this course, students will simulate the emergency room and engage with real techniques in operations research to improve emergency room efficiency. This simulation exercise will be conducted as a play in which students in groups take on the roles of patients, nurses, and doctors. On the final day of the course, students will compete for the most efficient flow in their respective plays.

Engineering The Future of Surgery (J-EHW-1B)*
Instructor: Judy T.
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
This course will introduce students to the basic principles of innovation and design for instruments and equipment in surgery. Students will learn about the history of surgery and apply the engineering design process to hands-on activities and gain an appreciation for the success and challenges faced by biomedical engineers. By solving a variety of engineering design challenges, students will learn to be innovative, creative, and critical thinkers. You will also have the opportunity to visit and tour a simulation centre used for training physicians, surgeons, allied health professionals, and researchers and work with simulation mannequins.
Ultrasound: See The Inside (S-EHW-1)
Instructors: Samaneh HosseingholizadehEhsan Jafarzadeh
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Sonographic imagery is ubiquitous with the images obtained from ultrasound technology. An ultrasound image can be used to confirm a pregnancy, diagnose certain conditions in body, and even detect defects in materials. This course is designed to introduce the key concepts of ultrasound and its applications in bio-medical and non-destructive testing. Students will transmit and receive ultrasound waves with the use of ultrasound probes, a pulser, and an oscilloscope in an ultrasound lab. They will also learn how to process the captured signals to produce an image or detect a defect in materials.
Road to Human Cyborg: How Machines Restore Lost Functions of Human Body (S-EHW-2A)
Instructor: Isaac Chang
Week 2 (July 15 – 19, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Losing a body function can be debilitating or even lethal, but recent advances in technology have challenged this notion. In biomedical engineering, various disciplines meet to tackle such problems present in medicine and health care. In this course, students will learn how medical problems are addressed using state-of-the-art biomedical electronic devices. Some of the topics covered in the course include an electrocardiogram (ECG), electromyogram (EMG), artificial limb prosthetics, and implanted devices. Throughout the course, students will learn the physiology of the human organs (e.g. heart, ear, muscles, etc.) and medical conditions associated with them. Additionally, students will perform hands-on activities to build electrical circuits to understand better how the biomedical devices discussed in the class function. During the course, students will also tour a research facility to observe the latest tools being developed to improve the health care system.
The Art of Capturing and Interpreting Brainwaves (S-EHW-2B)
Instructor: Afifa Saleem
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Engineers and doctors alike have been curious to explore the inner workings of the nervous system and its diseases since the 18th century. The pioneering studies of the time focused on proving the existence of electrical signals – inspired in part by a twitching frog leg. Today, brainwaves can be recorded directly from patients – on the scalp, just below the skull, or even on a single neuron level. Artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms allow us the ability to use these brainwaves to diagnose, treat and sometimes prevent diseases of the nervous system – anywhere from epilepsy to depression. In this course, you will find yourself traversing through the networks and pathways of the brain – by recording, analyzing and characterizing the electrical signals in living things. You will acquire a basic understanding of the electrical properties of the nervous system, explore the electrical system used to record signals from living tissue, and implement coding algorithms to process and detect abnormalities in the signals.
Gene Therapy and Genetic Techniques (J-EHW-3)*
Instructors: Judy T.
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
This course will introduce students to topics in genetics, cloning and gene therapy, and genetic engineering. Students will gain valuable hands-on experience with techniques used in genetics, cell and molecular biology through labs involving DNA extraction, agarose gel electrophoresis, bioinformatics, and bacterial transformation with green fluorescent protein (GFP). In addition, they will learn about the practical uses of these techniques in various industries and the ethical issues surrounding gene therapy. Students will learn to think critically and gain an appreciation for the successes and challenges in gene therapy.
Engineering The Future of Surgery (S-EHW-4A)
Instructor: Afifa Saleem
Week 4 (July 29 – August 2, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Modern medicine allows for minimally invasive surgeries to be performed at top-tier hospitals around the world. Biomedical engineers have led a critical role in the shaping of surgical procedures over the centuries, to make it more efficient, precise and safe. This course will introduce students to the basic principles of innovation and design for instruments and equipment in surgery. You will learn about the history of surgery and apply the engineering design process to hands-on activities. Students will solve a variety of engineering design challenges related to surgery and will learn to be innovative, creative, and critical thinkers.
Would You Like a Personalized Lung? (S-EHW-4B) *Cancelled
Instructors:Mohammad Ali Ahmadipour
Week 4 (July 29 – August 2, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the field of biomedical and tissue engineering. Throughout the course, students will learn about the challenges facing the medical field and how the aforementioned disciplines provide solutions to these obstacles. The course will explore respiratory and end-stage lung diseases (the second leading cause of death in North America) and how organ shortages challenge successful treatment. The introduction of engineered lungs as a unique solution which will be discussed. Students will learn about the details of the process such as decellularization, recellularization, and analysis. This course will outline how a substantial medical obstacle — such as an organ shortage — can be overcome by utilizing engineering principals. This course is divided into lecture and lab portions. Lecture portions will provide an introductory framework for the most crucial part of the process. This course will be comprised of a combination of lectures and experiential learning, coupled with group discussion and lab exercises. This course has been cancelled.

Manufacturing the Future 

From Lenses to Lasers: The Science and Engineering of Optics (J-MAN-1)
Instructors: Moein Shayegannia & Katelyn Dixon
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
From the earliest studies of light by Aristocles, to the development of basic optics by Newton, to modern discoveries by Einstein, Born, Wolff and other luminaries, the field of optics has advanced far beyond the humble lens. Optical fibres enable high speed internet; holography is used for entertainment and anti-counterfeit bank notes; lasers are used in supermarket scanners, military and medical applications. This course will focus on the fundamentals of optics, touching on exciting new developments in this constantly evolving field. Students will learn how telescopes and microscopes work and how to measure the refractive indices of materials. We will discuss how polarization is used in real-world applications such as sunglasses and 3D movies. At the end of the course, we will learn about lasers and state-of-the-art developments in the field of modern optics.
Engineering in Hollywood (J-MAN-3)*
Instructors: Sourabh Das
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
In this course, students will explore movies like never before.From the robotic puppets that brought Jurassic Park to life, to the practical effects in Lord of the Rings that allowed us to put Hobbits next to Wizards, and the technology that turned an actor into King Kong, students will learn about design principles and technology found in immersive and action-packed film environments. Additionally, students will learn about the engineering design process, computational tools, and a multitude of other elements that bring movies to life. Students will have the opportunity to investigate some of the logistical problems that face large and small scale film and television productions. The course will dramatically conclude with students creating and showcasing their own movie!
Art and History of Engineering (S-MAN-3A)

Instructors: Yasamin Kazemi
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Principles for the Development of a Complete Mind: Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses- especially learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” ― Leonardo da Vinci. In this multidisciplinary course students will focus on studying the history of engineering and its impacts on art and civilizations. Students will discuss the evolution of engineering throughout history and learn about the most impactful engineering masterpieces. Students will discuss the motivations and science behind such inventions, and extend their journey to the modern world to discuss the roles of engineers in modern societies.

Engineering Product Design 101 (S-MAN-3B)*
Instructor: Ali Nasseri
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
The iPhone, Gmail, and UBER are great products that are used every day. But what goes into creating a product that people actually use? In this course students will form teams to develop a product for consumers. Throughout this process, they will review principles of business analysis and marketing, and work on aspects of engineering design that play a role in product development. Depending on the projects selected, students will also engage with different topics in engineering relevant to their project. The course will end with pitching the products to potential investors.
Foodology (J-MAN-4)
Instructor: Azadeh Vatandous
Week 4 (July 29-August 2, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Do you fancy yourself as a foodie? Join us to learn about what goes into your food – from both a literal and investigative standpoint. In this course, students will be introduced to food science through the lens of engineering, and learn how this can be applied to their everyday diet. Sample topics may include food fortification –why salt can be a good source of iodine even though it doesn’t contain it naturally. Students will also be introduced to food guides and food labels and gain an understanding of what they contain and the important role they serve. Students can expect a healthy serving of technical and application-based study with a side of experiential learning with this course!

Moving People and Things

From the Ground Up: Introduction to Flight (S-MPT-1)*
Instructor: Ali Nasseri
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
How do planes manage to fly so predictably? Look no further for the answer! In this course, students will review the fundamental principles of flight, while also designing a controllable glider in the process. This journey starts with a review of aerospace systems, its components and design. Students will then touch briefly on the areas of science that are integrated to make flight possible. These include aerodynamics, stability, control and structures. At the end of this course, students will review of some of the current and future trends in aerospace engineering, all without the risk of losing their luggage!
A Crewed Mission to Mars (J-MPT-2A)*
Instructor: Ali Nasseri
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
What goes into designing a mission to Mars? Can it be that hard to get there? In this course, students will learn for themselves by designing their own mission to Mars! Students will take an interdisciplinary look at spaceflight, and some of the scenarios space engineers need to consider in mission design. Students will be introduced to topics including orbital mechanics, spacecraft components and space medicine, and will also participate in ground simulations to see what can go wrong during mission operations and how failures can be avoided.
The Science of Moving People (J-MPT-2B)
Instructor: Zahra Ansarilari
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Rapid population growth in cities require us to maximize the use of public facilities such as subway stations or shopping malls. Problems at this scale require a complex model that predicts where and how people move around cities. While individual behaviours as pedestrians vary, most try to choose the easiest and shortest path to walk from one place to another. In this program, students will investigate how to collect and analyze data regarding different types of pedestrian movement behaviour. Students will then simulate pedestrians’ behaviour based on the analysis of their date. Not only will students develop a simple and interesting agent-based movement game, but they will also uncover small changes that can be observed in how people follow hidden “rules” in their walking path choices.

Not Your Average Robot: Autonomous Systems and Robotics

Self-Driving Robots (S-NAR-1)*
Instructor: Tae Ha
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
The era of the self-driving car is fast approaching. Their intricate underlying technologies ensure not only to significantly reduce the fatality rate on the road, but also to minimize travel time. This course will provide an overview of the technologies behind self-driving cars, and explore high-level artificial intelligence programming techniques including localization and pathfinding algorithms, to intelligently integrating sensors with the pre-made robots. This hands-on experience will conclude with a final competition where students will deploy a self-driving algorithm on their robots for autonomous maze navigation.
Teaching Machines to Learn (S-NAR-2)*
Instructors: Justin Chu & Albert Lee
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Due to the exponential increase of computing power in the past decade, many problems that were once deemed unsolvable by a computer have been realized by using machine learning. Within the past year, there have been significant advancements in machine learning, such as DeepMind’s AlphaFold – a protein structure predictor – and AlphaStar – a StarCraft 2 bot. Research and industry are leaning heavily on machine learning to solve some of the most complex problems currently facing us today and investing on the technology to help us solve the problems of the future. In this course, we will introduce machine learning concepts and use current machine learning libraries to create algorithms that learn from data. Students will apply these algorithms to robotic arms to accomplish different tasks and compete in different challenges. May the smartest robot win!
Autonomous Maze Race (J-NAR-3)*
Instructor: Justin Chu
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Robotics research is growing at an exceptional pace. Robotic solutions provide answers to existing problems, as well as expand territory for research and further investigation. In this course, students will work in small teams to design, fabricate, and program a robot to traverse a maze autonomously. During the week, they will learn the science behind actuators and sensors and how these improve the performance of robots. The course will also cover wireless technology, such as Bluetooth, enabling the students to control their robots using their phones. By the end of the week, students will create a robot that can navigate a maze with or without human control.
Design, Build, Battle (J-NAR-4)*
Instructor: Justin Chu & Prangon Dey Swachha
Week 4 (July 29 – August 2, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Students are invited to join us for the ultimate robotics design challenge! Bring the imagination and creativity and we’ll give you the knowledge, parts, and electronics to make a robot for competition. Using 3D computer-aided design (CAD) software, students will work in small groups to design the most effective robot to win. In this design challenge, students will work through the entire engineering design process, from ideas to CAD models to prototypes and to a final design. On the last day, there will be a battle between designs to see who comes on top. Good luck and may the best team (and robot) win!

Smart Everything: Intelligent Systems

Codes and Cyphers (J-SME-1)*
Instructor: Prangon Dey Swachha
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Like thinking outside the box? Curious as to how logins keep users connected to their respected applications? Have an interest in decoding a senseless jumble of characters to reveal precious, precious data? Look no further — welcome to the cryptography course where questions will be answered that you haven’t yet thought to ASCII! Students will be familiarized with C# — one of the most commonly used coding languages for development — and also be introduced to different cipher methods, such as Caesar cipher. By the end of the course, students will learn to make their very own API with secured key/password.
Introduction to WebDev: Welcome to the Wonderful World of WordPress (J-SME-3)
Instructor: Hisan Shafaque
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Our world is increasingly online, and controlling the image of your digital persona has never been more crucial. Are you ready to design, build and develop your very own website? In this course, students will develop their own website on WordPress – the industry standard web platform that uses a simple and user-friendly content management system. Students will learn several tools including web programming languages and various web plug-ins to incorporate on to their own personal website. Students will have the opportunity to explore various site designs, including e-commerce, personalized portfolio and information-based before getting started on their own creations.
Cracking The Code (S-SME-3)*
Instructor: Kia Shakiba
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Senior 
(Grades 11-12)
Maintaining one’s privacy has become increasingly difficult in the modern world. For thousands of years, cryptography has played a major role in our civilization. From the early Caesar cipher to modern cryptocurrencies, cryptography has helped secure our information and protect our privacy. This course is an introduction to the world of cryptography. Students will gain hands-on experience with various cryptographic ciphers and learn the “do’s” and “don’t”s when creating secure messaging schemes. Students will also learn the fundamentals of cryptocurrencies and will create and mine their own blockchains. The importance of privacy, and methods for maintaining one’s privacy online will also be discussed.
Programming Development through Video Games (J-SME-4)*
Instructor: Albert Lee
Week 4 (July 29 – August 2, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Have you ever dreamed of designing your very own video game, but didn’t know how to start? In this course, students will explore how a video game is designed, starting from the fundamentals. This includes a necessary set of steps including learning to capture user input, utilize data structures to track specific data, and implementing algorithms based on in-game choices. By the end of the course, students will possess the fundamental building blocks for game design, and have made their very own game.

Sustainable Solutions

The Air We Breathe (J-SUS-1)
Instructor: Peter Murphy
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
The air we breathe goes from tailpipe to climate. This course will begin with determining what’s in the air, followed by measuring air quality during on-location field trips, concluding with a discussion of the implications on human health and society. Students will debate climate change perspectives, take their own ultrafine particle measurements, and figure out what is in the air around them. Join us to learn about atmospheric chemistry, energy policy, and environmental engineering.
From Salty to Sweet (J-SUS-2A)
Instructor: Hiba Doudar
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Although water covers 70% of our planet, two-thirds of the available fresh water is tucked away in frozen glaciers, or inaccessible for human use. By 2030, 47% of the world’s population will be living in areas of high water stress. Desalination and Reverse Osmosis have already been implemented in a number of developing countries and refugee camps as a sustainable solution to providing hygienic and drinkable water. In this course, students will learn how these challenges are addressed through the fundamentals of reverse osmosis, including osmotic pressure, concentration gradient and unit operation. An experimental setup of reverse osmosis operation will be done, and students will perform basic water sampling and testing techniques.
Powering the Sustainable Transition (J-SUS-2B)
Instructor: Alex Milovanoff
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Energy is fundamental for human development. Energy conversion results in serious social and environmental repercussions: global warming, air pollution, biodiversity losses. Modern society is facing a crisis as to how best invest its current resources for its energy consumption for the future. In this course, students will explore the current challenges of modern energy systems (transportation, electricity production, heating production) and some solutions to achieve sustainable development. Students will learn and apply the fundamental physics of energy conversion technologies, such as wind turbines, and solar panels, and will be exposed to the engineering challenges of developing these technologies. Students will explore the roles engineers play to make the world a better place.
Urban air pollution: what are we breathing? (S-SUS-2)
Instructor: Laura Minet
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Why is air pollution such a concern in urban areas? What are the major sources of air pollutants? How can we improve air quality? The aim of this course is to answer these questions and explore the impacts of poor air quality on human health. By conducting measurements in the city and modeling the dispersion of air pollutants, students will understand the factors influencing urban air quality. Students will also be introduced to the solutions engineers design to reduce emissions and decrease air pollutant levels.
We Built This City (S-SUS-3A)
Instructor: Larry Kei
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Since the dawn of civilization, civil engineering has been the foundation of cities. In the bigger picture, regional city planning dictates the design of road networks, water supply, waste treatment, energy production and environmental preservation. The construction of buildings is of social, economic and environmental concern to a variety of stakeholders. This course focuses on the complexity of building cities and the intricacy of building individual structures at such a scale. Students will be role playing as city planners to make decisions using basic land use principles. Moreover, the instructor will guide students on a journey to uncover the layers of “secret” infrastructure beneath a city.
Energy Management (S-SUS-3B)
Instructor: Parth Dave
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Growing population, diminishing resources, and environmental degradation are major concerns in our modern world. In this course, a detailed study will be conducted to find optimal solutions to global environmental and energy problems. Experiential-learning will be delivered along with fundamental theory about current and future potential energy sources.
Solar Cell Physics, Materials, and Devices (J-SUS-4)
Instructors: Moein Shayegannia & Andrew Flood
Week 4 (July 29 – August 2, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
In the last decade, solar generation of electricity has gone from being “the future” to the present. Whether driven by concerns of climate change, air pollution, or energy independence, solar cells have become commonplace and prices have decreased exponentially. As of 2016, more solar generated electricity infrastructure is being installed than any other single source. In this course, students will focus on the fundamental physics behind solar cells, the different types of solar cells (including next generation technologies), and their fabrication. Students will also be discussing solar cell installations, their use in architecture, and the impact of solar energy on society. Students will learn both in the classroom and on-site through demonstration, experimentation, problem-solving, and fabrication of a simple solar cell.
What's on your water bottle? (S-SUS-4B)
Instructor: Hiba Doudar
Week 4 (July 29 – August 2, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Have you been curious about the list of minerals and numbers on your water bottle? Join us in this course to learn more about water sampling and testing techniques. In this course, students will learn about the fundamentals of water sampling techniques, and a projected visit to the lake will be done to take samples to the lab. Additionally, students will work in small groups to test water and perform chemical and biological testing for water samples.

The Not-So-Basic Basics: Fundamental Physics & Engineering

Simulations of the Quantum World (S-NSB-1)*
Instructors: Zacharie Leger & Kelsey Eakin
Week 1 (July 8-12, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
From ultra-precise clocks to encryptions, revolutionary computing protocols to microscopes, quantum mechanics is entangled with everything we do. Many spooky observations also required the development of a theory of quantum mechanics. In this course, students will view quantum mechanics through different lenses including theoretical and experimental, to examine the properties of quantum mechanics. Using code, students will model and expand on experimental results discovered in the lab. They will then use this model to try and predict the outcome of future experiments. Through this process, students will be able to see how quantum mechanical particles evolve, illustrating what is at the centre of our universe.
Turning up the Dial to 11! (J-NSB-2)
Instructor: Sourabh Das
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Signals and communication are the backbone of modern civilization. Without which we wouldn’t have phones, radio, televison, or the internet. The fundamentals of waves and signals explored in this course range from designing a sound system, to transmitting signals for communication. In this course, students will learn how to build a functional speaker out of everyday materials, which can used to play music directly from their phones!
Foundations of Quantum Mechanics (S-NSB-2)*
Instructor: Zacharie Leger
Week 2 (July 15-19, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
Come and explore the ideas that have shaped the most successful quantitative theory ever made. The tenets that shape quantum mechanics allow for the developments of new technologies and protocols which show great promise, but also threaten most of society’s current encryption methodologies. This course presents a rigorous introduction to both the theoretical and experimental, and will explore its applications to quantum technologies. This course will cover the implications of this theory and explore such topics as quantum entanglement, cloning, quantum computers, and much more.
Physics Mysteries Unravelled (J-NSB-3)*
Instructor: Hazem Daoud
Week 3 (July 22-26, 2019)
Junior (Grades 9-10)
Are you familiar with the phenomena of twins travelling at different speeds aging at different rates? How about tiny particles occupying two different positions at the same time? If you are interested in such paradoxes, this is the course for you! From classical mechanics to electromagnetism to quantum mechanics and relativity we will explore the fundamentals of physics and answer these paradoxes. Students will learn the basic concepts underlying many exciting phenomena in nature and perform experiments to test these phenomena themselves. By the end of the course, students will have a broader perspective of the basic theories of physics, and an understanding of some of their real-life applications.
Computational Physics (S-NSB-4)
Instructor: Alex Cabaj
Week 4 (July 29 – August 2, 2019)
Senior (Grades 11-12)
When faced with equations that cannot be solved exactly, physicists and engineers need to turn to numerical methods to simulate the behaviour of physical systems. Thankfully, with advances in technology, calculations which were previously near-impossible by hand can now be performed by computers in a fraction of a second. From calculating the states of subatomic particles, to predicting the weather, to solving equations of motion for planets orbiting stars, numerical methods can simulate a wide variety of physical systems. This course will teach students how to write computer programs in Python to solve the equations that govern the motion of several different physical systems. Students will also be introduced to exciting topics in modern physics such as quantum mechanics, and special relativity, along with the mathematics necessary to better understand them. Over the course of the week, students will have a chance to work in small groups and choose one (or more) of several physical systems to simulate using Python.

(This course assumes no prior knowledge of Python.)